Library

Access our school library catalog here.

For regular updates on the collection, book reviews, suggested book lists, and other library-related news, please visit Rachel’s SK library blog.

Library:

The Summers-Knoll library supports the mission of Summers-Knoll School and aims to provide all members of the Summers-Knoll community with access to and understanding of print and electronic information resources. The library is at the literal and metaphorical heart of our school. We aim to develop a library collection and program that reflects and supports our school community and its values.

Each class visits the library at least once per week for thirty minutes (including book check out) as part of the regular class schedule. The librarian also works individually with teachers to teach concepts of information literacy to classes as these topics relate to curriculum-specific content.

The librarian also runs evening book discussion groups for students in grades 3-6 and their parents. Past books included George by Alex Gino; Fish in a Tree by Lynda Mulally Hunt; Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson; and The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly. This year’s book selections include Book: An Autobiography by John Agard; Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin; and In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse by Joseph Marshall III. These discussion groups serve as a way to connect our community of readers across generations. We use books as a lens through which we foster conversations about complex topics.

Information Literacy:

In kindergarten through second grade, learning is as concrete as possible, anchored in physical experiences and/or leading to physical experiences with pictorial and kinetic application. As such, information literacy in the early elementary grades is comprised of printed texts almost exclusively (exceptions being videos, audiobooks, and other digital materials that teachers share with students).

As students enter grades 3-4, they begin to use computers and tablets for class projects and self-directed learning. They have access to a classroom set of computers and use them to both consume information (watching videos and reading articles, for example) and create information (developing animations using programming tools, writing assignments, for example). Alongside digital tools, the concepts of digital citizenship are also introduced.

In the middle school (grades 5-8), the focus on information, media, and digital literacy as well as the focus on ethical digital behavior deepens. Best practices in schools suggest that instead of teaching a “computers” class, technology should be intentionally embedded in the content of the classroom so that email or the Internet or a digital camera or any other tool is understood to be just that — a tool that students use to accomplish a task. Teachers understand their professional responsibility to teach students how to use technology and online resources safely and productively, and to use this opportunity to teach them how to use what are, for almost all adults in their lives, absolutely essential tools.

The Summers-Knoll library supports the mission of Summers-Knoll School and aims to provide all members of the Summers-Knoll community with access to and understanding of print and electronic information resources. The library is at the literal and metaphorical heart of our school. We aim to develop a library collection and program that reflects and supports our school community and its values.

To suggest new materials for the library, please use this library suggestion box.

We also have a wide variety of magazines available in the library, such as:

Ask
Click
Cricket
Dig
Hi Five
Highlights
Odyssey
Spider

Our library collection development policy is available here.

If you have questions about the library, please contact Rachel Goldberg (rgoldberg@summers-knoll.org).